Research is in our DNA.

Carnegie Mellon University is a leader in research, with a focus on real-world impact that benefits real people. Our faculty are doing cutting-edge work, and our students have ample opportunity to get involved in research. Check out the stories below to learn more about the research happening on our campus.

Researchers Urge the Scientific Community to #StopPandemicBias

While there is little doubt that COVID-19 will have lasting impacts on health and the economy, a group of researchers is bringing attention to the effects the pandemic could have on the careers of scientific researchers by launching a Twitter campaign - #StopPandemicBias - which aims to bring broader understanding to how COVID-19 will impact scientists.

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New Intelligent Science Stations Change Maker Spaces

Carnegie Mellon University researchers developed a new type of mixed-reality platform that can help children learn basic scientific concepts while experimenting in the physical world with the help of an AI agent.

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SURF Student Decodes Death Data

Zhenzhen Liu, a senior majoring in statistics and machine learning, has always been interested in data-driven analysis of social issues. For the past year, Liu has applied her passion toward Carnegie Mellon University's Center for Human Rights Science (CHRS) under the direction of Robin Mejia, statistics manager, and Jay Aronson, the center’s director.

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Video Game Teaches Productive Civil Discourse and Overcoming Tribalism

A Carnegie Mellon University researcher is proposing that students can learn to make their civil discourse more productive through a video game powered by artificial intelligence. The educational system targeted toward high schoolers adapts to students' specific values and can be used to measure — and in some cases reduce — the impact of bias.

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Analyzing Cells for Future Biomedical Devices

Yu-li Wang, professor of biomedical engineering, and his team are researching cell migration while using the technologies developed for potential applications in artificial organs and other devices. The team has been awarded a five-year research grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), to support this work.

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Which Way to the Fridge? Common Sense Helps Robots Navigate

A robot travelling from point A to point B is more efficient if it understands that point A is the living room couch and point B is a refrigerator, even if it's in an unfamiliar place. That's the common-sense idea behind a "semantic" navigation system developed by Carnegie Mellon University and Facebook AI Research (FAIR).

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Smile, You're on Camaroptera

Imagine a small, inexpensive device that could look at a parking lot to see which spaces are filled and which are not. Or one that could find traffic jams and reroute others away from it. Maybe such a device could even keep an eye out for dangerous situations in public places. Brandon Lucia, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, and team imagined a device like this, and they named it Camaroptera, after a tiny, industrious bird.

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New System Combines Smartphone Videos To Create 4D Visualizations

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have demonstrated that they can combine iPhone videos shot "in the wild" by separate cameras to create 4D visualizations that allow viewers to watch action from various angles, or even erase people or objects that temporarily block sight lines.

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No Meshing Around

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed an efficient new way to quickly analyze complex geometric models by borrowing a computational approach that has made photorealistic animated films possible.

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A Remote Control for Neurons

A team led by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University has created a new technology that enhances scientists' ability to communicate with neural cells using light. Tzahi Cohen-Karni, associate professor of biomedical engineering and materials science and engineering, led a team that synthesized three-dimensional fuzzy graphene on a nanowire template to create a superior material for photothermally stimulating cells.

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A Clear Solution to Protect Healthcare Workers

With a shortage of personal protection equipment available during the COVID-19 pandemic, health care professionals have an increased risk of contracting the disease. They are particularly vulnerable during intubation procedures when patients can expel a broad spray of infectious fluid. Local experts have a solution — a clear, acrylic containment box that significantly reduces the risk of spreading COVID-19 to medical workers.

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